June Calendar

June 4th Eid-al-Fitr

Eid-al-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر‎) is a day of feasting and is celebrated on the first of Shawwal (10th month of the lunar Islamic calendar).  This Eid is a reward to the Muslims who spent the month of Ramadan fasting and in worship. Like Eid al Adha, this Eid begins early in the morning with a prayer held in a large, open area. Before the Eid prayer, Muslims are obligated to pay Zakat-al-Fitr, a charity that goes to poorer families who cannot otherwise engage in the festivities.

    • Prophet Muhammad asked the Muslims of Madinah about two carnivals that they used to engage in.  They replied that before Islam, celebrating by setting up grand carnivals was traditional.  It is reported that Muhammad said,  Instead of those two days, Allah has appointed two other days which are better, the days of Eid-al-Fitr and Eid-al-Adha. (Book of Hadith).
    • For Eid-al-Fitr it is customary to eat breakfast before prayer (unlike Eid al Adha).  It is the tradition of the Prophet Muhammad to eat something sweet.
    • In accordance with Islamic tradition, many Muslims wake up extra early on Eid-al-Fitr to take a bath, called ghusl.  They also wear the best clothing they own.
    • In Islamic South Asian communities, sheer khorma is typically made for breakfast.  Sheer khorma is a sweet milky dish with broken vermicelli pasta, dried fried dates, and roasted nuts.
    • Women often decorate their hands with beautiful henna designs on Eid-al-Fitr.  In the United States, many Islamic centers have henna booths set up on the last night of Ramadan.
    • The prayer of Eid-al-Fitr, like the prayer of Eid al Adha, begins with a sermon.  During this sermon, the Imam encourages Muslims to do good deeds and be responsible citizens.  After prayer, Muslims hug all people around them and say Eid Mubarak, which is a way of saying, Congratulations.  The words Eid Mubarak translate to Eid Blessings.

 

 

 

 

  • June 6th World Oceans Day

    World Oceans Day serves as a celebration of our oceans, which generate most of the oxygen that we breathe, feed us and regulate the planet’s climate. The day also serves to promote the oceans’ contribution life and the need to protect it from harmful pollution, overexploitation, destructive fishing and climate change.  Unfortunately, as a result of human pollution and exploitation, the world’s oceans are becoming increasingly delicate.

    In 1992, the Government of Canada proposed World Oceans Day at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.  By 2002, the Ocean Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to conservation of the planet’s oceans, began to promote and coordinate the event on a global scale. Finally, in December of 2008, the United Nations General Assembly officially proclaimed June 8th as World Oceans Day.

  • The Earth is covered by water on 71% of its surface, 96.5% of that water is in the oceans.
  • It is estimated that 50-80% of all life forms on Earth is found under the oceans’ surfaces. Oceans consist of 99% of all living space on the planet.
  • If all of the Earth’s ice melted, the oceans would rise 66 meters and flood all low-lying ground.
  • The lowest point on the plantet is located in Mariana’s Trench in the western Pacific. The point, known as Challenger Deep, is 11,034m deep. (Mt. Everest is only 8,848m tall).
  • We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea, whether it is to sail or to watch – we are going back to whence we came. – John F. Kennedy
  • If you live near an ocean, spend time swimming in the water, sailing, surfing or just walking along the beach. If you don’t live near an ocean, plan a trip to enjoy ocean.
  • Join the Wear Blue, Tell Two campaign. Wear blue clothes and share two ocean facts with friends.
  • Get your scuba diving license. Every city offers scuba lessons to prepare you see the underwater world. PADI and SDI are two well-known and reputable companies that offer certification courses. You cannot scuba dive without certification.
  • Watch one of many documentaries about oceans. Some of our favorites: The Death of the Oceans, Garbage Island, Plastic Seas, Deep Sea and Acid Test: The Global Challenge of Ocean Acidification
  • Host a waterside cleanup or adopt a local waterside and do your part to help the oceans and its wildlife.  World Oceans Day website offers a tool kit to help set up these activities.
  • June 14th Father’s Day

    Father’s Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood, paternal bonds, and the influence of fathers in society. In Catholic Europe, it has been celebrated on March 19 (Saint Joseph’s Day) since the Middle Ages. This celebration was brought by the Spanish and Portuguese to Latin America, where March 19 is often still used for it, though many countries in Europe and the Americas have adopted the U.S. date, which is the third Sunday of June. It is celebrated on various days in many parts of the world, most commonly in the months of March, April and June.Father’s Day was not celebrated in the US, outside Catholic traditions, until the 20th century. As a civic celebration in the US, it was inaugurated in the early 20th century to complement Mother’s Day by celebrating fathers and male parenting.

    After Anna Jarvis‘ successful promotion of Mother’s Day in Grafton, West Virginia, the first observance of a “Father’s Day” was held on July 5, 1908, in Fairmont, West Virginia, in the Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South, now known as Central United Methodist Church.[3] Grace Golden Clayton was mourning the loss of her father, when in December 1907, the Monongah Mining Disaster in nearby Monongah killed 361 men, 250 of them fathers, leaving around a thousand fatherless children. Clayton suggested that her pastor Robert Thomas Webb honor all those fathers.[4][5][6][7]

    Clayton’s event did not have repercussions outside Fairmont for several reasons, among them: the city was overwhelmed by other events, the celebration was never promoted outside the town itself and no proclamation of it was made by the city council.

    In 1957, Maine Senator Margaret Chase Smith wrote a Father’s Day proposal accusing Congress of ignoring fathers for 40 years while honoring mothers, thus “[singling] out just one of our two parents”. In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation honoring fathers, designating the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Six years later, the day was made a permanent national holiday when President Richard Nixon signed it into law in 1972.

June 19th Juneteenth or Freedom Day

There’s more than one Independence Day in the U.S. but the one that occurs in June is neither widely known or a national holiday. On June 19, 1865, General Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas, and announced that slaves were now free. The slaves had been freed by the Emancipation Proclamation but far from Washington D.C., the Texas slaves had been kept ignorant of the fact. Since then, June 19 has served to commenorate the new independence of the former slaves.

    • Slaves had already been emancipated, they just didn’t know it. The June 19 announcement came more than two and a half years after Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, so technically, from the Union’s perspective, the 250,000 slaves in Texas were already free—but none of them were aware of it, and no one was in a rush to inform them.
    • There are many theories as to why the law wasn’t enforced in Texas. News did in fact traveled slowly in those days—it took Confederate soldiers in western Texas more than two months to hear that Robert E. Lee had surrendered at Appomattox. Still, it was over two years before the slaves got word of their freedom, and logic lends strength to the suspicion Texan slave owners purposely suppressed the announcement. Other theories include that the original messenger was murdered to prevent the information from being relayed or that the Federal government purposely delayed the word to Texas in order to get one more cotton harvest out of the slaves. Probably it was simply that Lincoln’s proclamation simply wasn’t enforceable in the rebel states before the end of the war.
    • The announcement actually urged freed slaves to stay with their former owners. General Order No. 3, as read by General Granger, said: “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.”
    • Obviously, most former slaves weren’t terribly interested in staying with the people who had enslaved them, even if pay was involved. In fact, some were leaving before Granger had finished making the announcement. What followed was called “the scatter,” when droves of former slaves left the state to find family members or more welcoming accommodations in northern regions.
    • Even after the arrival of a Union Army presence, some slaves were still held. Texas is large, and General Granger’s order (and troops to enforce it) were slow to spread. In July 1867 there were two separate reports of slaves being freed, and one report of a Texas horse thief named Alex Simpson whose slaves were only freed after his hanging in 1868. Even wors When legally freed slaves tried to leave, many of them were beaten, lynched, or murdered. “They would catch [freed slaves] swimming across [the] Sabine River and shoot them,” a former slave named Susan Merritt recalled.
    • When freed slaves tried to celebrate the first anniversary of the announcement a year later, they were faced with a problem: Segregation laws were expanding rapidly, and there were no public places or parks they were permitted to use. So, in the 1870s, former slaves pooled together $800 and purchased 10 acres of land, which they deemed “Emancipation Park.” It was the only public park and swimming pool in the Houston area that was open to African Americans until the 1950s.
    • After a while, the celebration waned during the era of Jim Crow laws.Not  until the civil rights movement of the 1960s, when the Poor People’s March planned by Martin Luther King Jr. was purposely scheduled to coincide with the date. The march brought Juneteenth back into prominence.It wasn’t because people no longer wanted to celebrate freedom—but, as Slate reported in an article, “it’s difficult to celebrate freedom when your life is defined by oppression on all sides.”
    • As seems only fitting, In 1980, Texas was the first state to establish Juneteenth as a state holiday under legislation introduced by freshman Democratic state representative Al Edwards. By 2008, nearly half of US states observed the holiday as a ceremonial observance. As of 2014, 43 of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have recognized Juneteenth as either a state holiday or ceremonial holiday, a day of observance. States that do not recognize it are Hawaii, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota.
    • Though most states now officially recognize Juneteenth, it’s still not a national holiday. As a senator, Barack Obama co-sponsored legislation to make Juneteenth a national holiday, though it didn’t pass then or while he was president.

About angela1313

I am a cat lover, a writer, and an overextended blogger trying to foster for a cat rescue, finish a Master's degree and rehab a fixer upper house i bought.
This entry was posted in Celebrations, Joys of Life, Ritual and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to June Calendar

  1. Timothy Price says:

    Lots of interesting facts.

    Like

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